Every Day Feasts · Junior League of Tampa

Discovering the Popover!


Rather than featuring traditional Thanksgiving recipes this month, how about we mix it up?! In keeping with the sentiment of giving thanks, let’s try to appreciate new things. We all have our go-to recipes and while November conjures thoughts of apple pies, pumpkin, squash and hearty stuffing, I wanted to try something unfamiliar and unexpected.

It’s funny; I’ve flipped through our Everyday Feasts cookbook many times and never had even the slightest interest in trying our Popover recipe. That was until I had the best popover ever. Jordan Pond House, Bar Harbor Maine is where I had the pleasure of discovering this lovely treat.

Jordan Pond House

Hard to explain exactly what a popover is, but they look like giant muffins that flake apart somewhat like a croissant, are hollow in the middle, and crispy on the outside. They pair well with butter and jam, or equally as well with a savory, steamy soup.

Start with a few humble ingredients.

Popover

Bake until puffed high and golden brown – no opening the oven while baking!

Popover

Pair with coffee, butter, jam and enjoy!

Popover

Popovers

Everyday Feasts

2 eggs

¾ cup milk

¼ cup water

1 tablespoon butter, melted

1 cup flour

½ teaspoon salt

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Heat a 12-cup muffin pan or popover pan in the oven for 10 minutes. Combine the eggs, milk, water and butter in a medium bowl and whisk until blended. Combine the flour and salt in small bowl. Add to the egg mixture and whisk just until combined.

Remove the pan from the oven and brush the muffin cups with vegetable oil. Pour the batter into the prepared muffin cups, filling ¾ full. Bake for 30 minutes. Do not open the oven door. Popovers will be puffed and golden brown. Remove the oven and serve immediately.

For Garlic-Thyme Popovers, sauté 1 minced fresh garlic clove and 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme in 1 tablespoon butter. Substitute the mixture for the butter and prepare as directed above.

Recipe Notes:

I used a regular muffin tin, which when cooked the popovers were very close together (some touching). A popover pan (basically just a muffin tin with more spacing in between) may have been slightly better if you have one handy.

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